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Syllabus for 10th Grade World History

 

Teacher: Ms. Sujata Sangwan           

Room: 203                  Voicemail: 612/692-1499   Email:sujata.sangwan@mpls.k12.mn.us

Course description: Welcome to 10th Grade World History.  This course offers a colorful and exciting section of social studies subjects.  By the end of the year, you will have a solid foundation for entering 11th grade.

Course Objectives: The primary objective is to prepare you to have skills for 11th grade. We focus on academic skills, writing, time management and inter-personal communication skills. Small and large group discussions are a part of classroom learning.  All students are expected to participate in them. This course is writing intensive. You will regularly practice your writing skills. In-class research essays, participation, tests and projects make up a majority of your quarter grade.

Our class in World History moves very quickly and covers a lot of material. Therefore, it is important not only that students keep pace with the course, ask questions and seek additional help when needed.  Ms. Sangwan is willing to meet with students after school with requested appointments on Mondays.

 

By the end of this year, you will:

 

ØDemonstrate and strengthen your ability to write formal essays/research papers.

ØStrengthen your note-taking skills.

ØCompare/contrast/synthesize and analyze information.

ØExercise critical thinking and communication skills in formal and informal discussions.

 

You need the following to have in class each day:

Blue or Black ink pens and pencils.

Colored pencils and markers      

Notebook for taking notes in class.                     

Student Planner and ID

 

What you should have for regular use in class:

A dictionary and/or thesaurus   

A copy of APA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers

 

COURSE POLICIES: Course policies are the rules and guidelines our class follows, in addition to those established by Patrick Henry High School (All Patrick Henry rules and expectations are enforced in Ms. Sangwan's classroom).  These policies are consistently enforced throughout the school year and are reviewed at the beginning of each quarter.  Each student is expected to know, understand and follow these policies.  If you feel class or school policies need clarification speak with Ms. Sangwan directly.

ATTENDANCE: Prompt daily attendance is expected.  All students must be seated in the classroom and prepared to learn when the bell rings. Each tardy will cost you academic points and negatively influence your grade. According to Patrick Henry policy, you fail the course if you have more than seven absences during an academic quarter. Approved school activities do not count against attendance, provided the student attends the activities, follows procedures and is doing satisfactory work in class.  Additionally, if a student is aware of up-coming absences, it is her/his responsibility to inform Ms. Sangwan before the absences and arrange make-up or alternative work. A friend in class is helpful to collect materials and information if you are absent.                              

CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR: You are a member of a community of learners.  For any community to thrive, certain concepts must be embraced.  In our community, I expect the following general behavior of all students.

RESPECT:  All students will respect themselves, their community members and their learning environment.

READINESS:  All students must attend class everyday and ready to actively participate in daily activities.

RESPONSIBILITY:  All students must accept responsibility for themselves and their actions.

 

Active participation and preparedness is expected at all times!

 

        No distracting items are allowed in the classroom (i.e. headwear, coats, backpacks, food, beverages, chains, purses, electronic devices, pictures, notes, yearbooks, magazines and catalogs).

        Appropriate language will be used in the classroom—no swearing or other offensive remarks will be allowed.

        You are responsible for your academic progress and communication with Ms. Sangwan about problems or struggles is expected from you.

 

CHEATING, COPYING AND PLAGIARISM

Cheating, copying and plagiarism are serious acts of academic dishonesty that are not tolerated.  All team teachers, family members of students involved and the program coordinator will be informed of such behavior.  

Students who cheat receive a zero for the assignment or exam. Students involved in copying of work receive a zero for the assignment or exam, including any student allowing the copying to take place. Students who plagiarize receive a failing grade for the quarter.   

Plagiarism is the use of another’s ideas or expression without appropriate acknowledgement of the source.  

Examples of plagiarism include failure to give appropriate acknowledgement when repeating another’s phrase, sentence or paragraph; failure to give appropriate acknowledgement when paraphrasing another’s thesis or argument; failure to give appropriate acknowledgement when presenting another’s line of thinking; or, turning in a paper for a current course that was written for another course.   

Plagiarism, like cheating and copying, results in serious consequences. If students or family members have questions about this, please talk to Ms. Sangwan.  All students are expected to achieve at the level of 60% or better in this class without factoring in extra credit. As a general rule, students should not expect extra credit.  Opportunities for extra credit related to course content may arise throughout the year. Additionally, students choosing to drop their lowest score of the quarter are not allowed any extra credit points.  

 

HOMEWORK: All homework assignments must be completed on the scheduled due date. Unless otherwise noted, assignments are collected at the beginning of the class period. ALL ASSIGNMENTS ARE ACCEPTED WITH 25% POINTS DEDUCTED ON THE NEXT DAY AND NO LATER.  Students receive reading packets with excerpts from a variety of sources as well as primary source documents.  Course content has been put together through a variety of sources and is regularly updated as new and reliable information is made available.    Reading packets made available to students may be done so in class-sets. Therefore, it is necessary that students use the reading time given in class effectively.

 

GRADING SCALE IN PERCENTAGES:

93-100%=A

 

90-92%=A-

 

86-90%=B+

 

83-86%=B

 

80-82%=B-

 

77-79%=C+

 

73-76%=C

 

70-72%=C-

 

67-69%=D+

 

63-66%=D

 

60_62%=D-

 

59% or below=F

 

High School World History

 


 

Quarter I

 

Essential Question:

·        How do civilizations arise and how do they change?

 

Units:

1. Nomadic and Agricultural Societies

2. The Cradle of Civilization

3. Nile River Civilizations

4. Greeks and Romans

 

 

Quarter II

 

Essential Question:

·        What is the relationship between religion and empire?

 

Units:

5. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

6. African Kingdoms

7. Ancient Asia

8. The Americas 

Quarter III

 

Essential Question:

·        How does geography influence destiny?

 

Units:

9.   Medieval Europe and Byzantium

10. Renaissance and Reformation

11. Colonization and Imperialism

12. Industrial Revolution

 

Quarter IV

 

Essential Question:

·        How have the legacies of imperialism and conflict shaped our world?

 

Units:

13. World War I

14. Global and Regional Conflict

15. Independence

16. Globalization

 

 

Floating Unit: Historical Inquiry

(all quarters)


 

 

High School World History - Quarter I

 

Quarter One Essential Question: How do civilizations arise and how do they change?

 

1. Nomadic and Agricultural Societies

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how emerging societies are shaped by geography.

? How are emerging societies shaped by geography?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the earliest human societies and the processes that led to the emergence of agricultural societies around the world.

1. Students will analyze the biological, cultural, geographic, and environmental processes that gave rise to the earliest human communities.  

2. Students will describe innovations that gave rise to developed agriculture and permanent settlements and analyze the impact of these changes.

 

 

2. The Cradle of Civilization

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the characteristics of civilization and the process of its emergence.

? What does it mean to be civilized?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the major characteristics of civilization and the process of its emergence.

1. Students will locate various civilizations of the era in time and place, and describe, and compare the cultures of these various civilizations.  

2. Students will analyze the spread of agricultural societies, and population movements.

 

3. Nile River Civilizations

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the role the Nile River played in the development of Egyptian civilization.

? What role did the Nile River play in the development of Egyptian civilization?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient African civilizations.

1. Students will locate various African civilizations and describe their structures and ways of living.

 

 

 

4. Greeks and Romans

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how people create, maintain, and change governments.

? How do people create, maintain, and change governments?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Greek civilization and its influence throughout Eurasia, Africa and the Mediterranean.

 

1. Students will analyze the influence of geography on Greek economic, social, and political development, and compare the social and political structure of the Greek city-states with other contemporary civilizations.  

2. Students will analyze the influence of Greek civilization beyond the Aegean including the conflicts with the Persian empire, contacts with Egypt and South Asia, and the spread of Hellenistic culture throughout the Mediterranean.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Rome from about 500 BC - 500 AD and its influence in relation to other contemporary civilizations.

 

1. Students will analyze the influence of geography on Roman economic, social and political development, and compare its social and political structure to other contemporary civilizations.   

2. Students will compare Roman military conquests and empire building with those of other contemporary civilizations.  

3. Students will analyze the influence of Roman civilization, including the contacts and conflicts with it and other peoples and civilizations in Eurasia, Africa and the Near East.  

4. Students will compare the disintegration of the Western Roman Empire with the fate of other contemporary empires.

 

 

 

 

High School World History - Quarter II

 

Quarter Two Essential Question: What is the relationship between religion and empire?

 

5. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the history, the characteristics, and the rise of major world religions.

? What beliefs are shared by Judaism, Christianity, and Islam?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of Islamic civilization from about 600 - 1000 AD.

 

1. Students will identify historical turning points that affected the spread and influence of Islamic civilization, including disputes that led to the split between Sunnis and Shi’ah (Shi’ites). 

2. Student will explain significant features of the Islamic culture during this period.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the history and rise of major world religions.

1. Students will understand the history, geographic locations, and characteristics of major world religions, including Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Islam, as well as indigenous religious traditions.

 

6. African Kingdoms

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how geography influences the economic and religious choices people make.

? How does geography influence the economic and religious choices people make?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of civilizations and empires of the Eastern Hemisphere and their interactions through regional trade patterns.

 

2. Students will describe the influence of geography on the cultural and economic development of the African kingdoms of Ghana, Mali and Songhai.

 

 

7. Ancient Asia

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how geography influenced the religious, cultural, and economic development of Japan, China, Southeast Asia and India.

 

? How did geography influence the religious, cultural, and economic development of Japan, China, Southeast Asia and India?

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of civilizations and empires of the Eastern Hemisphere and their interactions through regional trade patterns.

1. Students will describe the influence of geography on the cultural and economic development of Japan, China, Southeast Asia and India.  

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the history and rise of major world religions.

1. Students will understand the history, geographic locations, and characteristics of major world religions, including Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Islam, as well as indigenous religious traditions.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient civilizations in South and East Asia.

1. Students will locate various civilizations of the era in India, China, Korea and Japan, and describe their structures and interactions.

 

 

8. The Americas

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how geography influenced the cultures of the ancient Mesoamerican and South American civilizations.

? How did geography influence the cultures of the ancient Mesoamerican and South American civilizations?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Mesoamerican and South American civilizations.

1. Students will locate various Mesoamerican and South American civilizations and describe their structures and ways of living.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of complex societies and civilizations in the Americas.

1. Students will compare the emergence, expansion and structures of Mayan, Incan, and Aztec civilizations. 

2. Students will analyze patterns of long distance trade centered in Mesoamerica.

 

 

High School World History - Quarter III

 

Quarter Three Essential Question: How does geography influence destiny?

 

9. Medieval Europe and Byzantium

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the roles religion, social organization, conflict, exploration, and trade played in the social, economic, and political changes of the medieval period.

? What roles did religion, social organization, conflict, exploration, and trade play in the social, economic, and political changes of the medieval period?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Byzantine Empire.

 

1. Students will describe the events leading to the establishment of Constantinople as the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire and analyze the significance of this event. 

2. Students will describe Byzantine culture and examine disputes and why they led to the split between Eastern and Western Christianity.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 - 1000 AD in terms of its impact on Western civilization.

1. Students will describe the spread and influence of Christianity throughout Europe and analyze its impact.

2. Students will explain the structure of feudal society and analyze how it impacted all aspects of feudal life.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the interactions between Christendom and the Islamic world, 750 - 1500 AD.

1. Students will describe the emergence of European states of Christendom and analyze the conflicts among them and other Eurasian powers.  

2. Students will describe the emergence of Islamic states in Africa, the Near East, Iberia and India, and analyze the conflicts among them and other Eurasian powers. 

3. Students will analyze the clashes between Christendom, Islam, and other peoples and polities. 

4. Students will analyze the emergence of the Ottoman Empire and its implications for Christendom, the Islamic World, and other polities.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of overseas trade, exploration, and expansion in the Mediterranean, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, 1000-1500 AD.

1. Students will compare the Indian Ocean region with the Mediterranean Sea region in terms of economic, political, and cultural interactions, and analyze the nature of their interactions after 1250 CE.

2. Students will compare Chinese exploration and expansion in the Indian Ocean and East Africa with European exploration and expansion in the Atlantic Ocean and West Africa. 

3. Students will analyze the economic, political, and cultural impact of maritime exploration and expansion.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of social, economic, and political changes and cultural achievements in the late medieval period.

1. Students will describe the emergence of European states and analyze the impact. 

2. Students will explain conflicts among Eurasian powers.

3. Students will identify patterns of crisis and recovery related to the Black Death, and evaluate their impact.

4. Students will explain Greek, Roman, and Arabic influence on Western Europe.

 

10. Renaissance and Reformation

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how the Renaissance and Reformation was a period of rebirth, conflict, and change.

? How was this period a time of rebirth, conflict, and change?

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of development leading to the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe in terms of its impact on Western civilization.

1. Students will identify and analyze the economic foundations of the Renaissance.

2. Students will describe the rise of the Italian city-states, identify the role of political leaders, and evaluate the impact. 

3. Students will identify individuals and analyze their contributions to the artistic, literary, and philosophical creativity of the period.  

4. Students will analyze the short- and long-term effects of the religious, political and economic differences that emerged during the Reformation.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of economic and political interactions among peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

1. Students will explain why European powers were able to extend political control in some world regions and not others, in the 15th and 16th Centuries.

2. Students will explain the consequences of the exchange of plants, animals, and disease microorganisms in both the Americas and Eurasia.

3. Students will explain the development of a world market of mineral and agricultural commodities. 

4. Students will explain the development of the trans-Atlantic African slave trade and its impact on African and American societies.

 

 

11. Colonization and Imperialism

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the motives, methods, and consequences of colonization and imperialism.

 

? Students will understand the promise and the consequences of new ideas from the Age of Reason.

? What were the motives, methods, and consequences of colonization and imperialism?

 

? How did new ideas from the Age of Reason improve the human condition?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the status and impact of global trade on regional civilizations of the world after 1500 AD.

1. Students will identify and explain the impact of exploration on culture and economies.

2. Students will describe the location and development of the Ottoman Empire.

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the integration of large territories under regional and global empires.

1. Students will examine and analyze how trade- based empires laid the foundation for the global economy. 

2.  Students will explain the impact of increased global trade on regional economies. 

3.  Students will analyze the impact of military conflicts among imperial powers on trade and sovereignty. 

4.  Students will understand and analyze the role of religion as an integrative force in the empires. 

5.  Students will understand and analyze the interaction between imperial governments and indigenous peoples.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of scientific, political, philosophical, economic and religious changes during the 17th and 18th centuries.

1. Students will describe the Scientific Revolution, its leaders, and evaluate its effects.

2. Students will describe the Age of Absolutism, identify its leaders, and analyze its impact.                    

3. Students will identify the leaders and analyze the impacts of the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution on the development of English constitutionalism.

4. Students will explain the ideas of the Enlightenment contrasted with ideas of medieval Europe, and identify important historical figures and their contributions.

5. Students will analyze the causes, conditions and consequences of the French Revolution and compare and contrast it with the American Revolution.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of political and philosophical developments in Europe during the 19th century.

1. Students will analyze the Napoleonic Wars and the Concert of Europe.

2. Students will describe the factors leading to the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, and describe their long-term impact on the expansion of political rights in Europe. 

3. Students will describe major scientific, technological, and philosophical developments of the 19th Century and analyze their impact.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of European and American expansion.

1. Students will explain the rise of U.S. influence in the Americas and the Pacific. 

2. Students will analyze the motives and consequences of European imperialism in Africa and Asia.  

3. Students will compare motives and methods of various forms of colonialism and various colonial powers.

 

12. Industrial Revolution

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how the industrial revolution changed people’s lives.

? How did the industrial revolution change people’s lives?

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the effects of the Industrial Revolution during the 19th century.

1. Students will explain industrial developments and analyze how they brought about urbanization as well as social and environmental changes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High School World History - Quarter IV

 

Quarter Three Essential Question: How have the legacies of imperialism and conflict shaped our world?

 

13. World War I

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the causes, course, and consequences of World War I.

? What were the causes, course, and consequences of World War I?

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the worldwide impact of World War I.

1. Students will analyze the economic and political causes of World War I and how they interacted as well as the impact of technology on the war.  

2. Students will examine the Treaty of Versailles and analyze the impact of its consequences.

3. Students will analyze causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution and assess its significance.

4. Students will examine the League of Nations and analyze the reasons for its failure.

5. Students will examine events related to the rise and aggression of dictatorial regimes in the Soviet Union, Germany, Italy and Japan, and the human costs of their actions.

 

14. Global and Regional Conflict

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the causes, course, and consequences of World War II.

? What were the causes, course, and consequences of World War II?

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of the worldwide impact of World War II.

1. Students will analyze economic and political causes of World War II and examine the role of important individuals during the war and the impact of their leadership.

2. Students will understand and analyze impact of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the 20th Century.

3. Students will explain the reasons for the formation of the United Nations.

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of major events and outcomes of the Cold War.

1. Students will explain how Western Europe and Japan recovered after World War II.   

2. Students will explain key events and revolutionary movements of the Cold War period and analyze their significance, including the Berlin Wall, the Berlin airlift, Korean War, Cuban Missile Crisis, Sputnik, the Vietnam War, and the roles of the U.S. and Soviet Union in ending the Cold War.

3. Students will assess the impact of nuclear weapons on world politics.  

4. Students will identify contributions of world leaders of this time period.

 

 

15. Independence

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand the current political, social, and cultural consequences of the independence movements and the legacies of imperialism.

 

? What are the current political, social, and cultural consequences of the independence movements and the legacies of imperialism?

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of political, economic, social and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts.

1. Students will analyze the independence movement in India, the role of Gandhi, and the effectiveness of civil disobedience in this revolution.  

2. Students will analyze the struggle for independence in African nations.  

3. Students will explain how international conditions contributed to the creation of Israel and analyze why persistent conflict exists in the region.

4. Students will analyze how Middle Eastern protectorate states achieved independence from England and France in the 20th Century, and the current day significance of the oil reserves in this region.  

5. Students will understand the reasons for the rise of military dictatorships and revolutionary movements in Latin America.

 

16. Globalization

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? Students will understand how the end of the Cold War, the rise of globalization, the rise of jihadism, and other recent global developments have changed the world to date and how they will shape the world of the future.

 

? How have the end of the Cold War, the rise of globalization, the rise of jihadism, and other recent global developments changed the world to date and how will they shape the world of the future?

 

ê The student will demonstrate knowledge of significant political and cultural developments of the late 20th century that affect global relations.

1. Students will examine human rights principles and how they have been supported and violated in the late 20th Century.   

2. Students will describe and analyze processes of “globalization” as well as persistent rivalries and inequalities among the world’s regions, and assess the successes and failures of various approaches to address these.

ê The student will identify challenges and opportunities as we enter the 21st century.

1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the continuing impact of September 11, 2001.

 

 

High School World History – Floating Unit (all quarters)

 

Floating Unit: Historical Inquiry

 

 

 

Enduring Understanding(s)

Essential Question(s)

State Standard(s)

State Recommended Assessment Benchmarks

? The student will understand how to apply research skills through an in-depth investigation of a historical topic.

? The student will understand how to analyze historical evidence and draw conclusions.

 

? The essential question will vary with the type of project assigned.

 

ê The student will apply research skills through an in-depth investigation of a historical topic.

 

1. Students will define a research topic that can be studied using a variety of historical sources with an emphasis on the use of primary sources.  

2. Students will identify and use repositories of research materials including libraries, the Internet, historical societies, historic sites, and archives, as appropriate for their project.  

3. Students will evaluate web sites for authenticity, reliability, and bias.  

4. Students will learn how to prepare for, conduct, and document an oral history.  

5. Students will apply strategies to find, collect and organize historical research.

 

ê The student will analyze historical evidence and draw conclusions.

 

1. Students will understand the use of secondary sources to provide background and insights on historical events, and that secondary sources might reflect an author’s bias.  

2. Students will identify the principal formats of published secondary source material and evaluate such sources for both credibility and bias.    

3. Students will compare and contrast primary sources to analyze first-hand accounts of historical events and evaluate such sources for both credibility and bias.  

4. Students will review primary and secondary sources and compare and contrast their perspectives to shape their presentation of information relevant to their research topic.  

5. Students will understand the historical context of their research topic and how it was influenced by, or influenced, other historical events.  

6. Students will evaluate alternative interpretations of their research topic and defend or change their analysis by citing evidence from primary and secondary sources.